Category Archives: Opening

What is the role of the introducer?

speaker intro

What is the role of the introducer?

The person who introduces the speaker has three key responsibilities. Each must be done to help make the presentation a success. Miss any one of these and you might handicap the speaker and hence the presentation.

1. The introducer needs to get the audience ready to listen. That might mean calling the audience back from their break or quieting them down. This is mostly logistical and it is important. Just imagine the impact if the speaker starts speaking while people are still wandering into the room or talking.

2. The introducer needs to convey the relevance of the presentation to the audience. Why should they listen? What might they learn? Why is this speaker the right person to speak? A well written introduction will cover this step. If the introduction is too long and boring, the introducer might need to shorten it. Another point to keep in mind is that the audience didn’t gather to hear the introduction. They came to hear the speaker.

3. The introducer needs to make the speaker feel welcome. It doesn’t matter how many times this speaker has presented – he still needs to feel good about speaking to this audience. The introducer meets with the speaker before the presentation to get acquainted and confirm signals. The introducer is the host that encourages the audience to welcome the speaker with applause.

The role of the introducer is important and should be taken seriously.

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What’s the difference between a speaker’s bio and an introduction?

bio vs intro

What’s the difference between a speaker’s bio and an introduction?

Many people don’t realize the difference and often say bio when they mean introduction. And many non-professional speakers mistakenly supply their bio as an introduction.

There is a big difference between these two documents in their purpose and hence their form. Function always drives form. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

Should I thank the introducer?

Should I thank the introducer?

It’s your turn to speak. The introducer just gave you a warm and flattering introduction. Should you thank the introducer for that introduction?

No.

Why?

Three reasons: Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How to ensure you get the introduction you want for your presentation

How can you ensure that you get the introduction you want for your presentation?

Write the introduction that you want the introducer to deliver.

The purpose of the introduction is to build the anticipation of the audience for your presentation. You want them thinking, “Yeah, I’m looking forward to this.”

The only way to ensure that your introducer says the right thing is to give him the script to read. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What are the three parts to a good presentation?

What are the three parts to a good presentation?

An effective presentation has three distinct parts. They are: the Opening, the Body and the Close.

Many speakers ignore the opening and the close. They simply stumble into the body and ignore the close.

Even though the opening and the close might only comprise 5 to 10 % of the total presentation time they can be at least and sometimes more important than the body of your presentation. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What common mistakes should you avoid when starting your speech?

What common mistakes should you avoid when starting your speech?

If you want to start your presentation with a bang instead of a bust avoid these ten mistakes. These 10 tips will show you how not to start your speech and what to do instead.

1. You like me, you really like me
Sally Fields said this when she accepted her academy award. Her gushing outburst was mocked because it seemed unprofessional. We all want to be liked but Sally pushed our puke button with her act. If they are giving you the award don’t insult them by pretending that you don’t deserve it. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com