How to stop your voice from shaking during public speaking?

How to stop your voice from shaking during public speaking?

First consider that no one is as familiar with your voice as you are. The first time you heard your recorded voice you were probably surprised. You might even have said, “That’s not me.”

The reason I point that out is that you might notice your voice shaking but your audience might not. They just might not know how your voice should sound. Your voice can sound different at different times of the day depending on your energy level, recent meal or emotional state.

Your voice shaking could signal that you are tensing up because of anxiety, anger or exhaustion. There might be other causes but these seem to be the most common.

If tension is the problem the solution is to relax. You can do that by pausing as soon as the shaking starts. Simply pause for a few seconds. Smile while doing that so your audience doesn’t suspect any difficulties.

To both extend the pause and relax your throat you could have a drink of water. It’s best to have a glass of room temperature water handy. Ice cold water isn’t good for your speaking voice.

Take a deep slow breath to help calm you. Roll your shoulders because tension in your shoulders could easily be transferred to your throat. You could slightly change your body stance because tension might have been setting in without you being aware.

When you start speaking again, speak slower. That also relaxes your throat and makes your voice sound deeper and hence more confident.

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Written by gtorok

gtorok

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© George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

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