How do I start the question period when nobody asks a question?

How do I start the question period when nobody asks a question?

This happens often because the speaker suddenly stops talking and says, “Are there any questions?”

The audience is caught unexpectedly because they had no time to prepare a question.

It takes both time and thought to ask a good question and most people don’t want to ask a dumb question. So it’s usually safer to wait for someone else to start the questions. There are three things the speaker can do to make this easier on the audience and solicit better questions. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How long should it take to prepare a presentation?

How long should it take to prepare a presentation?

It depends on how new the information is to you, who you are presenting to and the importance of the presentation.

The rule of thumb is three hours of preparation for every hour of presentation.

But that is only a rule of thumb. If you are an effective presenter, Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

Should I move when I speak?

Should I move when I speak?

Maybe. Move if it helps support your message. Most likely moving your head to look around the room and moving your hands to emphasize key points will help the presentation. Don’t stand still like a statue. That would probably look unnatural and feel uncomfortable. Feel free to move parts of your body to demonstrate that you are alive and passionate about your subject. But don’t let your arms flail about aimlessly. That would be distracting at the least. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What’s the worst presentation sin?

What’s the worst presentation sin?

Not respecting time.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that your time is more valuable than the collective time of your audience.

Just because you were told that you would have a 60 minute time slot – don’t count on getting 60 minutes to speak.

Why? Because things change. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

When should the speaker take questions?

When should the speaker take questions?

The speaker decides and states the terms of question and answer to the audience. Depending on the circumstances of the presentation the audience might not follow the stated rules of engagement.

If it’s a sales presentation the client or prospect will likely make the rules. If the presentation is to senior management the audience might make the rules. If you are presenting to your boss and he’s a bully, guess who makes the rules. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How can we deliver a better team presentation?

How can we deliver a better team presentation?

Team presentations are probably the worst types of presentations that most of us have endured. That includes our experience as an audience member and as part of the team.

Why are team presentations so bad? Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How do I capture the attention of the audience?

How do I capture the attention of the audience?

Here are three ways to capture the attention of your audience during your next presentation.

1. Be relevant
Speak to the interests of the group. Point out why this is important to them. Answer the question in the mind of your audience, “What’s in it for me?” Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How many words should there be on a PowerPoint Slide?

How many words should there be on a PowerPoint Slide?

There is no golden rule for exactly how many words should be on a slide. However, just know that “less is more” when it comes to text. The more text that’s on the screen, the less your audience is listening to the information that’s coming out of your mouth.

Remember that you need to simply convey your message on each slide in three seconds or less. Therefore, you have to keep things SIMPLE and highly visual. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How many slides should I use in my business presentation?

How many slides should I use in my business presentation?

This is a common question for business presenters using PowerPoint. Many people are looking for a number. Some self-proclaimed presentation experts will boldly state “one slide for every 3 minutes” or “maximum of 20 slides no matter how long you speak”. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What are the three parts to a good presentation?

What are the three parts to a good presentation?

An effective presentation has three distinct parts. They are: the Opening, the Body and the Close.

Many speakers ignore the opening and the close. They simply stumble into the body and ignore the close.

Even though the opening and the close might only comprise 5 to 10 % of the total presentation time they can be at least and sometimes more important than the body of your presentation. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com