Should I move when I speak?

Should I move when I speak?

Maybe. Move if it helps support your message. Most likely moving your head to look around the room and moving your hands to emphasize key points will help the presentation. Don’t stand still like a statue. That would probably look unnatural and feel uncomfortable. Feel free to move parts of your body to demonstrate that you are alive and passionate about your subject. But don’t let your arms flail about aimlessly. That would be distracting at the least.

Should you walk around? That’s a different question. The answer again is maybe. Only move if it helps your message. More importantly, move only if the movement appears purposeful to the audience.

Don’t wander around just because you are anxious and need to work off some energy. This can seem pointless and anxious to your audience. Don’t pace back and forth! That can be terribly annoying to your audience and destructive to your message.

When you have something important to say – stand still. This makes it easier for people to hear your message. When you are walking and talking at the same time they need to divide their attention between watching and listening, and watching tends to draw more attention in our brains.

Yes, it’s okay to move when speaking. It should look natural and purposeful to your audience. Walk only during the less important words.

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Written by gtorok

gtorok

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© George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

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