Tag Archives: mistakes

Should I thank the introducer?

Should I thank the introducer?

It’s your turn to speak. The introducer just gave you a warm and flattering introduction. Should you thank the introducer for that introduction?

No.

Why?

Three reasons: Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What is the most common mistake speakers make when presenting information?

What is the most common mistake speakers make when presenting information?

I’ve asked this question of my audience over the past two decades and the answer is always the same. “Speakers deliver TOO much information!”

It seems funny. Everybody knows the answer yet many speakers continue to commit this deadly mistake.

Why? Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

Where should I look when I am delivering a speech?

Where should I look when I am delivering a speech?

You should look at the people to whom you are speaking.

If you are speaking to an audience of one, that’s easy. If your audience is more than one person then you will need to move your eyes from one person to another while speaking.

Don’t move your eyes too quickly or linger too long on one person.

Deliver a phrase while looking at one person then move your gaze to another for the next phrase or sentence. Look people directly in the eye.

That eye contact makes you appear more confident and truthful.

Do Not Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

Should I finish my presentation with “Thank You”?

Should I finish my presentation with “Thank You”?

No.

There is nothing wrong with saying “thank you” to your audience. But don’t end on those words because “thank you” is a weak close.

The purpose of the close is to reinforce the key message. People tend to remember the last thing they heard. You might believe that they heard your entire presentation word-for-word – but they didn’t. They also forget most of what they heard. There is a good chance that they’ll remember your close if you deliver it well. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How do I handle a question about past mistakes?

Let’s admit the truth. None of us is perfect. There are no perfect products. No system is perfect. No organization is perfect.

So don’t pretend to be perfect or try to project an image of perfection to your clients, colleagues or the public. I didn’t say that you need to reveal all your flaws. Just don’t defend when someone points out a mistake. Admit the error and move on. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com