Tag Archives: speaking skills

What’s the best way to close a sales presentation?

call to action

What’s the best way to close a sales presentation?

If you want to persuade your audience to act, then almost every presentation is a sales presentation. You might not be asking for money but you still want your audience to do something. Perhaps you’re selling your idea, cause or perspective.

The best way to end that type of presentation is with a call to action. Remind people what you want them to do.

This might be:

• Get out and vote
• Donate to the cause
• Join the team
• Express your support
• Teach your children
• Don’t drink and drive
• Exercise every day

The call to action is a simple, powerful and effective way to close your sales presentation.

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How to use a flipchart

flipchart

How to use a flipchart

When you write on a flipchart, stand on the side that allows you to write without turning your back completely to the audience. They don’t want to stare at your backside while you’re writing.

Where to stand
If you are right handed, stand on the left side of the flipchart so you only need to make a quarter turn to write on the chart. If you are left handed, stand on the right side for the same reason.

Words
If you are putting words on the paper, be sure to print neatly and large. Slow down to print neatly. If you’re uncertain how large to print, test your printing before people are in the room. Print on the paper then stand at the back of the room to see for yourself.

Wide lines
Use chisel-point markers and print with the widest edge so people can read it easier.

Colors
Use dark colors for words or numbers – black, navy blue and dark green work best. Use red for underlines, circles and boxes to draw attention to certain parts. Don’t use red for words or numbers because it’s more difficult to read. Avoid pastel and fluorescent colors because they are difficult to see and often annoying.

Page
Don’t write on the bottom third of the page because people behind the first row might not be able to see it.

Writing pad
Check the writing pad before you start to ensure that there are enough pages for your presentation.

A flipchart is still a useful presentation aid for facilitating a session with a small group. Pay attention to the details to do it well.

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What’s the difference between a speaker’s bio and an introduction?

bio vs intro

What’s the difference between a speaker’s bio and an introduction?

Many people don’t realize the difference and often say bio when they mean introduction. And many non-professional speakers mistakenly supply their bio as an introduction.

There is a big difference between these two documents in their purpose and hence their form. Function always drives form. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What to do if you don’t believe you’re the expert

T1519086_24

What to do if you don’t believe you’re the expert

I’m not the expert on the topic. How should I present myself to this audience?

Okay, so you’re not Albert Einstein or Stephen Hawking.

No one expects you to be the world’s greatest expert on the topic – unless you described yourself as such in your self-promotional messages. I recommend that you don’t do that even if you think you walk on water. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How to ensure you get the introduction you want for your presentation

How can you ensure that you get the introduction you want for your presentation?

Write the introduction that you want the introducer to deliver.

The purpose of the introduction is to build the anticipation of the audience for your presentation. You want them thinking, “Yeah, I’m looking forward to this.”

The only way to ensure that your introducer says the right thing is to give him the script to read. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

What is the most common mistake speakers make when presenting information?

What is the most common mistake speakers make when presenting information?

I’ve asked this question of my audience over the past two decades and the answer is always the same. “Speakers deliver TOO much information!”

It seems funny. Everybody knows the answer yet many speakers continue to commit this deadly mistake.

Why? Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

Should you tell your audience that you aren’t prepared to speak?

Should you tell your audience that you aren’t prepared to speak?

No!

First, there is no acceptable excuse for not being prepared to speak. You should always be prepared to speak about the messages that are important to you and your organization. Sometimes you might be given only a few minutes notice. That’s why you must always be prepared to speak about your key messages. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

When should a speaker move?

When should a speaker move?

Some speakers claim that they have lots of energy so they like to move. Some speakers say that they are nervous and they feel better when they move around.

That could be the wrong reason to move when speaking. The important point is that when you move it should appear natural to your audience. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How can a speaker use quotes in a speech?

How can a speaker use quotes in a speech?

Using a good quotation in your speech could add strength to your message.

Here are four guidelines for using quotations in your speech.

1. State the source of the quote. Don’t pretend that those are your original words. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com

How do I start the question period when nobody asks a question?

How do I start the question period when nobody asks a question?

This happens often because the speaker suddenly stops talking and says, “Are there any questions?”

The audience is caught unexpectedly because they had no time to prepare a question.

It takes both time and thought to ask a good question and most people don’t want to ask a dumb question. So it’s usually safer to wait for someone else to start the questions. There are three things the speaker can do to make this easier on the audience and solicit better questions. Continue reading

George Torok was a shy student who learned how to speak in public. He has delivered over 1,000 professional presentations. He trains professionals, specialists and sales teams to deliver Superior Presentations. He coaches executives and leaders to deliver million dollar presentations. Visit www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com or www.Torok.com © George Torok. You may reprint or quote this information as long as you quote the source and link back to this site. www.QuestionsAboutPublicSpeaking.com